Art Walk and Short notes about Kino Glaz (Cinema Eye)

Two weeks ago I went to Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk. Downtown Art Walk celebrates the arts each and every month on the 2nd Thursday.

Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk

Downtown Art Walk desk at Los Angeles Art Walk

Art walks are interesting and inspiring places and you can find exciting and unique offerings around every corner from different artists. Also crowds at art walks are different too. The vibe is different, people act more free, they smile more, think more and interact more.

Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk

Artist performing during Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk

Gallery Exhibit @ Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk

One of the gallery exhibitions during Los Angeles Downtown Art Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While I was walking around an art piece attracted my attention.  (Unfortunately I lost my note about artist so if you know please let me know)

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It brings the memories about Russian film maker and film theorist David Abelevich Kaufman who is also known as Dziga Vertov.

Dziga Vertov

Dziga Vertov

“I make the viewer see in the manner best suited to my presentation of this orthat visual phenomenon. The eye submits to the will of the camera and isdirected by it to those successive points of the action that, most succinctly andvividly, bring the film phrase to the height or depth of resolution – Kino-Glaz, Dziga Vertov “

Vertov’s kinoglaz (Cinema Eye) does not try to fit into a film genre but creates its own. Man with a Movie Camera embodies Vertov’s visions of pure enchantment with the invention of film.

The Man With The Movie Camera Dziga Vertov (1929)

The Man With The Movie Camera Dziga Vertov (1929)

The Man With The Movie Camera Dziga Vertov (1929)

The Man With The Movie Camera Dziga Vertov (1929)

You can watch full movie from here:

The Man With The Movie Camera Dziga Vertov (1929)

The Man with the Movie Camera (1929) is a completely autonomous meta-cinematic celebration of film making and epidemiological Inquiry that seems to bear the burden of a manifesto. It is a film that questions film.

In the nineteen twenties, his personal journals are loaded with the confidence and the idealism that his stand would be victorious. His vision is grand, but awaiting doom. Of his situation he said, “Give me a fulcrum, and I overturn the world. I could repeat that after the ancient sage. But that’s just it. I don’t have a fulcrum.” Vertov is difficult to conclude because he was synchronously a purist and a propagandist, an avant-gardist and a primitive, a prophet and an android; he was all these things for the same reasons. The grandeur of what he wanted became the gauge of his disappointment